Whether or not the contracting parties have the necessary contractual intent is a question of fact that must be decided in light of the particular circumstances of this case. In the civil system, the concept of intent to create legal relations is closely linked to the “theory of the will” of contracts, as developed by the German jurist Friedrich Carl von Savigny during the 19th century. [22] In the 19th century, the fact that contracts were based on a meeting of minds between two or more parties and that their mutual agreement on an agreement or their intention to enter into contracts was of the utmost importance. While it is generally true that the courts want to resist the intentions of the parties,[23] the courts in the second half of the 19th century moved to a more objective interpretation,[24] with an emphasis on how the parties agreed with the outside world. In the face of this amendment, it has always been said that “the intention to be legally bound” is a necessary element of a treaty, but there has been a policy on when and when agreements should be implemented. The intention to create legal relationships, if not an “intention to be legally bound,” is a doctrine used in contract law, particularly in English contract law and in the related common law legal systems. [a] A contract is a legally binding agreement. Once an offer has been accepted, there is an agreement, but not necessarily a contract. The element that turns any agreement into a real contract is “the intention to create legal relationships.” It must be shown that the parties envisaged that the agreement should be governed by contract law. When evidence of intent is found, the agreement creates legal obligations that any offending party can be prosecuted. While individuals and small businesses, in particular, may be attracted to the idea of an informal agreement (perhaps on the basis of a handshake or a gentleman`s agreement), such an informal agreement could be dangerous. This is especially true when the agreement is reached in an environment that does not lend itself to normal trade negotiations.